Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/45275
Title: Neuromodulation as a cognitive enhancement strategy in healthy older adults: promises and pitfalls
Authors: Martins, Ana R. S. 
Fregni, Felipe 
Simis, Marcel 
Almeida, Jorge 
Issue Date: 2016
Serial title, monograph or event: Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
Volume: 24
Issue: 2
Abstract: Increases in life expectancy have been followed by an upsurge of age-associated cognitive decline. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have risen as promising approaches to prevent or delay such cognitive decline. However, consensus has not yet been reached about their efficacy in improving cognitive functioning in healthy older adults. Here we review the effects of TMS and tDCS on cognitive abilities in healthy older adults. Despite considerable variability in the targeted cognitive domains, design features and outcomes, the results generally show an enhancement or uniform benefit across studies. Most studies employed tDCS, suggesting that this technique is particularly well-suited for cognitive enhancement. Further work is required to determine the viability of these techniques as tools for long-term cognitive improvement. Importantly, the combination of TMS/tDCS with other cognitive enhancement strategies may be a promising strategy to alleviate the cognitive decline associated with the healthy aging process.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/45275
Other Identifiers: 10.1080/13825585.2016.1176986
DOI: 10.1080/13825585.2016.1176986
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CINEICC - Artigos e Resumos em Livros de Actas

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