Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/101238
Title: Competitive Nitrogen versus Carbon Tunneling
Authors: Nunes, Cláudio M 
Eckhardt, André K
Reva, Igor 
Fausto, Rui 
Schreiner, Peter R
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Project: info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028973/PT 
info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/UID/QUI/0313/2019 
Serial title, monograph or event: Journal of the American Chemical Society
Volume: 141
Issue: 36
Abstract: Quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) of heavy atoms like carbon or nitrogen has been considered very unlikely for the longest time, but recent evidence suggests that heavy-atom QMT does occur more frequently than typically assumed. Here we demonstrate that carbon vs nitrogen heavy-atom QMT can even be competitive leading to two different products originating from the same starting material. Amino-substituted benzazirine was generated in solid argon (3-18 K) and found to decay spontaneously in the dark, with a half-life of 210 min, to p-aminophenylnitrene and amino-substituted ketenimine. The reaction rate is independent of the cryogenic temperature, in contradiction to the rules inferred from classical transition state theory. Quantum chemical computations confirm the existence of two competitive carbon vs nitrogen QMT reaction pathways. This discovery emphasizes the quantum nature of atoms and molecules, thereby enabling a much higher level of control and a deeper understanding of the factors that govern chemical reactivity.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/101238
ISSN: 0002-7863
1520-5126
DOI: 10.1021/jacs.9b06869
Rights: embargoedAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CQC - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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